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Abstract Detail



Developmental and Structural Section

Kong, Dong-Rui [1], Schori, Melanie [2].

Reproductive novelties: the unusual floral development and embryology of Cardiopteris.

Cardiopteris, the only genus of lianas in Aquifoliales, has a number of reproductive features that have long puzzled botanists. Authors have disagreed on its floral sexuality, carpel number, stylar development, and embryology. Developmental studies of flowers and young fruits have resolved these questions and revealed several oddities. In the three species of Cardiopteris studied, flowers are perfect, staminate, or sterile. Three carpels are present, but they follow different developmental pathways. The adaxial carpel develops a style and stigma, while the two lateral-abaxial carpels each produce one ovule. The ovary apex, formed by the lateral-abaxial carpels, elongates into a fleshy appendage on the winged fruit after fertilization. The ovules are orthotropous and ategmic, with the egg apparatus located at the chalazal end. A haustorium develops along with a “pseudo-integument” and delayed anatropous curvature. The apical appendage, “pseudo-integument”, delayed anatropy, and chalazal egg apparatus appear to be unique among angiosperms. However, a tricarpellate ovary with a lateral style and bifid ovary apex are present in Citronella, Gonocaryum, and Leptaulus, supporting their inclusion in Cardiopteridaceae s.l.


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1 - Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory for Biodiversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Kunming, Yunnan, 650201, China
2 - Ohio University, 315 Porter Hall, Athens, OH, 45701, USA

Keywords:
Cardiopteris
Aquifoliales
embryology
floral development
Cardiopteridaceae.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 20
Location: Pines North/Boise Centre
Date: Tuesday, July 29th, 2014
Time: 9:30 AM
Number: 20006
Abstract ID:578
Candidate for Awards:None


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