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Abstract Detail



Bryological and Lichenological Section/ABLS

Pearson, Colby [1], Vos, Carlo [1], McKinney, Phillip [1], Holt, Emily [2].

A kinetic study of the breakdown of Atranorin in various solvents and pH.

Atranorin (AT) is a photo-protective, secondary metabolite of lichens, with potential human health applications, including anti-cancer, wound healing, antimicrobial, pro-oxidant and antioxidant, gastroprotective, mosquito abatement, and analgesic. This compound provides documented ecological benefits to the lichens in which it occurs, including photo-buffer, herbivore deterrent, and as a reducing agent to facilitate nutrient uptake. AT is known to break down, forming atranol and Ethyl hematommate. Our study investigates the solubility and instability of AT in various solvents and in different pH levels. The main goal of the research is to determine in which solvents and at which pH AT is most stable. This information can then be used to optimize the extraction and analysis processes for future work with AT. We used pure AT dissolved in the mostly commonly used solvents which were protic and non-protic ranging from very polar to non-polar, and measured the rate of AT breakdown over time using HPLC. We expected that the rate of breakdown for AT would be highest in protic solvents and in conditions of extreme pH. Very little research has critiqued the quantitative analysis of AT and our findings may have an impact on methods used for extraction and determination of AT concentration in lichens.


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1 - Utah Valley University, 800 West University Parkway, Orem, UT, 84058, USA
2 - Utah Valley University, Biology Department, 800 W University Parkway, Orem, UT, 84058, USA

Keywords:
atranorin
lichen
instability
solvent.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Eyrie/Boise Centre
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2014
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: PBR007
Abstract ID:879
Candidate for Awards:None


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